Giclée print

Giclée print.  Giclée, derived from the French verb gicler meaning “to squirt or spray”, was coined in 1991 by printmaker Jack Duganne for fine art digital prints made on inkjet printers. The name originally applied to fine art prints created on Iris printers in a process invented in the late 1980s but has since come to mean any inkjet print.

Giclée, is used to describe a fine art digital printing process combining pigment based inks with high quality archival quality paper to achieve an inkjet print of superior archival quality, light fastness and stability. Pigment-based inks have a longer lifespan, and can last anywhere from 100 to 200 years without significant fading. The process involves squirting or spraying microscopic dots of pigment-based ink onto high quality art paper or canvas. The image is colour corrected to attain the closest possible match to the original work. To be able to make such a high-quality print, the camera or scanner used to capture or scan the art must be able to do so with a high level of resolution. Most digital photos are recorded at a resolution of 72 DPI on the screen, or “dots per inch,” and the image file of an art print needs to be at least 300 DPI — because the more dots of color that can be printed in a small area, the more detailed your final image will appear.